How Do We Match Members To Jobs?

How Does Dringo Work? All FAQs
We do our best to make sure the connections you find on a job are great connections.  What I mean by a great connection, is someone who is in a position to help you land that job.  Someone who, if they gave you a referral, would increase your chances of landing that job as much as Bitcoin went up at the end of 2017 (something like over 400%).  But how do we do this?  We look at five things: connection’s place of work (company name), location of the job, location of the connection, industry of the job, and industry of the the connection.  These five data points allow us to group jobs and their connections into three separate categories: company match; company and location match; and company, location and industry/department match.  The more matches we find between a job and a connection, the higher we rank the job, because that connection is much more likely to be directly involved with the hiring process of that job.

Stage 1 Match: Company
Matching by company is very simple.  If a member of your group works for company X, and company X has a job posted in Dringo, that member becomes a connection of Job X. Every single job on Dringo has at least one stage 1 connection.

Stage 2 Match: Location
Matching by company alone often isn’t enough, though.  What if there’s a job with Google on Dringo?  Google has hundreds of thousands of employees spread out over the entire world.  A connection in California for a job in New York isn’t much of a connection.  This is where locations come into play.  If a job has a stage 1 connection, and that connection is within 20 miles of where the job is being offered, then that connection becomes a stage 2!  Stage 2 usually means that the connection is at the same office as the job being offered.  A job with a stage 2 connection will rank higher in the job search index than a job with only stage 1 connections.

Stage 3 Match: industry & department
Great, so we identify connections down to the office, but let’s go back to the Google example.  Let’s say you have a job from Google with a Stage 2 connection.  The connection is in the same workplace as the job being offered, but what if that workplace is Google’s campus in the San Francisco, where thousands of people work all over a sizeable campus in disciplines ranging from graphic design to scientific research?   This is where industry matching comes into play.  If a job has a stage 2 connection, and that connection is in the same industry as the job being offered (e.g., job is in engineering, connection is an engineer), then that connection becomes a stage 3!  Stage 3 usually means that the connection is not only in the same workplace, she also works in the same department within that office.  A job with a stage 3 connection will rank higher in the job search index than a job with only stage 1 or 2 connections.